Morally, I'm destitute.

Nina. Alive. Female. 16. Book blogger. Ox. Scorpio. Book lover. Carnie. Ravenclaw. Obsessive fan over anything to catch my eye. Food lover. Semi-occasional writer. Extremely occasional artist. Actually getting a novel down! Semi-good violinist. Slowly improving singer. Uses tumblr to keep track of shit . Queer. Looks like this. Might post spoilers. Chinese born. Resides in England. Fueled by tea and alcohol.

Apr 19
linguisticsyall:

romancingthelanguages:

“Shit It’s raining”

I can’t think of a better thing to put on an umbrella.

linguisticsyall:

romancingthelanguages:

“Shit It’s raining”

I can’t think of a better thing to put on an umbrella.

(via roseofchaos)


charlieplaidbury:

do u ever just see a person and think

wow ur cute but i bet u would be even cuter all bruised up and sweaty and panting and fucked out of ur mind

(via heyheyhippocampus)


emily-adomestic:

I made these to put up around my school for my school’s GSA. They are quotes from some little known bisexuals about their bisexuality.

Lets stop bisexual erasure and remember, bisexuality is real!

Edit: Gonna change Tom Daley to a diver instead of a swimmer before I post these in my school.

Also I had to cut the Anne Frank quote to make it more “school appropriate”. The poster quote makes it seem like she might have just wanted a friend, when the actual quote mentions her wanting to touch her friend’s breasts and how when she looks at nude statues and paintings in her art book, she wants to scream out in ecstacy at how beautiful they are. :P

And finally, I would love to add some POC but in all honesty it was hard enough finding these people. If you have any that you know of, please tell me. Keep in mind they have to be famous enough for most teenagers to know. Thanks!


bemusedlybespectacled:

doctadonner:

devildoll:



Every time I see this it’s a different person exactly how many people want the D of captain America.

all real americans want the captain america D it’s in our constitution

bemusedlybespectacled:

doctadonner:

devildoll:

image

Every time I see this it’s a different person exactly how many people want the D of captain America.

all real americans want the captain america D it’s in our constitution

(via siriuslblack)


nodaybuttodaytodefygravity:

gravity-loves-me:

vulpixc0re:

Life lesson: If anyone is scared of you, lick them.

#okay but if legendaries are basically like gods this is like zeus coming down from mt. olympus and licking your face

if it was zeus he’d do a hell of a lot more than lick your face let’s be real

nodaybuttodaytodefygravity:

gravity-loves-me:

vulpixc0re:

Life lesson: If anyone is scared of you, lick them.

#okay but if legendaries are basically like gods this is like zeus coming down from mt. olympus and licking your face

if it was zeus he’d do a hell of a lot more than lick your face let’s be real

(via snowy-direwolf)


Apr 18

jontronshat:

its called “mother earth” for a reason

I’m gunna fuck these mountains

(via marvellousheadfuckthing)


milesjai:

harrystilesstilinski:

Miles Jai saying what needs to be said.

"There was also a LGBT panel (at Playlist Live) that my friends were on. That was really fun to go to, and it was also very, um, enlightening. But the thing about having, like, an all gay cisgender white panel and calling it a "LGBT panel" even though there’s only gay white people on it isn’t really very accurate. And you know, I feel like a lot of people, even the panelists, have agreed that there should be more representation on the panel. I mean, who could they find that represent a different part of the LGBT spectrum? So yes, more represntation in the LGBT panels. Not just like, one lesbian and 4 white gay guys."

here’s to more diverse panels in the future! :)

(via jehanstiel)


jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

(via theangelstakebakerstreet)


thefoxxnextdoor:

My thing is, have sex whenever you decide to want to have sex. You want to have sex on the first night, go ahead. You want to have sex after 20 dates, go ahead. You want to never have sex, go ahead. People think that someone’s sexual choices actually coincide with their personality. If all you can think of someone’s worth is whether they want to have sex or not, then the problem is probably you.

(via halloween-king)


Apr 17
keanureefs:

anglosexual:

undeadthug:



guess where abstinence-only education is taught

But Nevada has it together

keanureefs:

anglosexual:

undeadthug:

guess where abstinence-only education is taught

But Nevada has it together

(via halloween-king)


winchester-like-the-gun:

batreaux:

*points at your girlfriend* you gonna eat that

sexual pun or hannibal reference i can’t decide

(via halloween-king)


santasnaping:

If you don’t like Emma you are mistaken.

(via catchingfirebeginswithaspark)


lesbianwicce:

during the witch burning times, midwives were targeted because they were healers and they eased the pain of childbirth which was meant to be woman’s punishment for eating the apple in the garden of eden.

birth control and abortion were considered sinful for the same reason.

anti-choice sentiment started because people (men) wanted women to be punished, and these misogynistic ideas have carried on for hundreds of years.

what a sad reflection on our society.

(via asexualtrekkie)


doctorsassypantsonfire:

dingdongyouarewrong:

If you’re sick of Clara Oswald being reduced to a romantic interest for the doctor clap your hands
If you’re sick of Clara Oswald receiving less character development in half a series than a cyber man head got in one episode clap your hands
If you’re sick of Clara Oswald being pushed into the same stereotypical female character mold and not being allowed to shine or develop independently of the doctor clap your hands

image

(via thesnowflakemenagerie)


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